Chemo Sensitivity Testing for Individual Cancer Treatment

“What we call evidence-based medicine is really a catchword for pharmaceutical-based medicine.”

I taped this short clip describing chemo-sensitivity testing 5 years ago. Dr. Linchitz’s colleague Dr. Gonzalez, well-known for his anti-cancer protocols, products and high rates of cures, was among the natural medicine doctors that died mysteriously last year. In the full interview which seems to be unavailable online, both doctors are advocating more individualized testing procedures, and recognize the sham that is the scientific-medical-pharmaceutical cancer industry.

Transcript:

“Dr. Gonzalez talked about a specific issue, for example, bone marrow transplants on cancer patients. I would go one step further and look at the entire body of scientific knowledge and medicine and question whether or not the very basis of that knowledge is off. What I’m speaking about specifically is what’s called the gold standard which is a double-blind, placebo controlled trial. This is a large scale trial on hundreds, sometimes thousands of patients. The very nature of that assumes that everybody is the same, that all breast cancer patients are the same. Everybody gets a protocol, and either that protocol does well or another protocol does better, and it’s assumed since this is the best protocol and you’re a breast cancer patient you fit into this. This really ignores the individual differences between patients. I know Nick’s work with his cancer patients and ours is very much individualized.

The chemo sensitivity testing is now going mainstream, we’ve been doing this for 5 years. We actually look at the patient’s cancer cells and determine what they respond to. What we found is that in hundreds and hundreds of breast cancer patients there are no two patients that are identical; no two patients respond to the identical chemo drug, no two patients have identical molecular structure so that their targeted agents work the same.

Here’s an example: Avastin was once approved as a breast cancer drug and then disapproved as a cancer drug. It was NEVER a breast cancer drug. It’s actually a targeted agent that targets something called vascular endothelial growth factor (vegF). Some breast cancer patients have that and some don’t. It’s easier for the pharmaceutical companies to continue a type of research which is research that’s always been done. There are millions and millions of breast cancer patients in the US. So of course, if Avastin gets approved as a breast cancer drug it’s a huge financial success. It’s much more difficult to check every single breast cancer patient – does this one express vegF, does this one not express vegF – and to actually do a study that has some meaning is much more difficult, much more expensive.

The very structure of the so-called scientific evidence that we have is very faulty. One of the type of treatment we do is insulin potentiation therapy (IPT). Almost every patient that comes into our office says, “if this is working so well why aren’t there studies that show IPT works as well as conventional therapy?” The reason is, who funds all the research and medicine now, where’s the money coming from? It’s the pharmaceutical companies. Can you think of a pharmaceutical company that would be interesting in funding a study that says you only need 10% of a drug? It’s just not going to happen.

As Dr. Gonzalez said, the very basis of scientific research in the US has to be questioned. So, what we call evidence-based medicine is really a catchword for pharmaceutical-based medicine. And yet, there’s plenty of evidence. Dr. Gonzalez talked about Dr. Beard’s work on pancreatic enzymes. There are doctors that are doing very good work, for example, Dr. Arggawal on curcumin in cancer patients. All these natural spices that have been used for thousands of years have a tremendous amount of data building up. Are we going to see a large-scale, double-blind placebo controlled trial on thousands and thousands of cancer patients with curcumin? Who’s going to pay for it?  It’s not a patentable drug, it’s just not going to happen.

The whole movement in medicine now is to standards of care, one size fits all and algorithms. You can pretty much substitute a computer for a doctor in that kind of system because everybody’s going to get the same treatment.  It’s just not going to work, people weigh different amounts, their bodies work differently, their livers work differently, they detoxify medications differently. The human body is an incredibly complex machine and it’s not going to work if you don’t individualize treatment. “

Dr. Gonzalez’s website: http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/index.htm

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