Activated charcoal: The universal antidote

Did You Know…that the oldest “universal antidote” may be one of the best anti-aging supplements of all time? 

Medical records from ancient Egypt, Greece, and other societies across the centuries prove that the world has long relied on a safe, non-drug substance called activated charcoal as a “universal antidote” for almost all poisons.

Although activated charcoal has mostly fallen by the wayside of effective but forgotten medical treatments except for emergency poisoning treatment. Hospital emergency rooms today do still use activated charcoal as a first line of defense when treating patients who have ingested toxic agents.

Given its record as a defense against hardcore toxins, it’s hardly surprising that activated charcoal can be used to treat and prevent more minor health issues as well. Experts indicate it can be used to alleviate complaints such as…

Gas
Bloating
General digestive issues
Heart health
Unwanted signs of aging
Why You Should Take Coal Off Your Naughty List

At this time of year, your first association with “coal” is likely to be the small black lumps left by Santa Claus for those on the naughty list. But importantly, activated charcoal is a very different form of this familiar “coal” material—it is activated. This means that a source of carbon (bituminous coal, wood, or coconut shells are common sources) has been burnt at a high temperature and subjected to a special process to remove all of the oxygen, leaving behind a highly adsorbent material.

The word “adsorption” looks like the word “absorption,” but it is a different process. Adsorb something means “to bind to” something. Activated charcoal has millions of tiny pores, which give just 2 grams of powder approximately the same surface area as a football field. Furthermore, its porous surface has a negative charge, so it attracts positively charges substances including…

Heavy metals
Chemicals
Intestinal gases
Though all these molecules weigh 1000s of times more than the charcoal itself, its incredible adsorptive capacity allows it to capture, bind to, and remove these poisonous substances.

Coal: The Key to Health… and Everlasting Youth?

In addition to protecting us from acute threats such as poisons, activated charcoal rids the body of low-grade, chronic toxins as well. Thanks to the prevalence of processed food and environmental pollution, we are all exposed to toxins on a daily basis. This ongoing exposure can lead to serious problems such as…

Cellular damage
Allergies
Weakened immune system
Premature aging

Regular use of activated charcoal flushes accumulated toxins from your system and promotes healthy function of your digestive tract. Users report an almost immediate sense of renewal.

Flushing out toxins brings benefits beyond improved digestive health. Studies reveal taking activated charcoal can prevent cellular changes associated with aging. Prominent gerontologists—doctors who specialize in the study of aging—conducted research showing that activated charcoal can increase the average lifespan of older test animals by about 34%!

Activated charcoal appears to work in part by enhancing the adaptive function of essential organs, including the adrenal gland… liver… and kidneys. It also slows the brain’s increasing sensitization to toxins, which occurs with age. This neuroprotective effect leads to improved cognitive function.

Using Activated Charcoal

Activated charcoal can be found readily—and very inexpensively—in health food stores and online. Very few negative side effects have been noted in conjunction with the use of activated charcoal, but experts do urge special caution for potential users who also take prescription medications. Experts point out that activated charcoal must be taken as far apart from doses of prescription drugs as possible. If not, the drugs will bind to the charcoal, rather than entering your body. It’s also recommended to discuss the use of activated charcoal with your doctor, especially if you take other medications.

By Danica Collins

(Source: UndergroundHealthReporter.com; January 18, 2015; http://tinyurl.com/pcht6uf)

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