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THE STORY: There are 2 main theories about disease and infection. Pasteur’s germ theory emphasizes pathogenic germs; Bechamp’s host theory emphasizes the inner terrain or microbiome of the host.

THE IMPLICATIONS: Has Western Medicine become too swayed by fear of germs? Are we looking too much outside of ourselves to Big Pharma drugs and products to save us? Why are we not cultivating our inner terrain to build strength so disease cannot arise?

Your Inner Terrain…

…defines you and your state of health. Your microbiome, which consists of bacterial cells that outnumber your human cells 10:1, is the key to your health. This is why natural health and medical experts have declared that your gut is like your second brain. However, the last thing that Big Gov and Big Pharma want you to understand is how powerful you are. Stories of a bad bacterium or virulent virus are far more sensational, sexy and scary – far more of an easy sell – than the plain old truth that you have to work to consciously foster and create a healthy inner terrain to ward off disease. What money can Big Pharma make by telling you to carefully take more micronutrients (e.g. minerals, vitamins, enzymes, cofactors, etc.) to build strength? It’s far better for them if you believe the world is full of scary micro-creatures and diseases, and that there’s nothing you can do other than take their products – vaccines, synthetic pills, radiation and more. Yes, there is truth in both perspectives, but if you only focus on the outer terrain and germ theory, and minimize or forget about the inner terrain, you are playing right into their hands. The whole debate of inner terrain vs. outer terrain goes back at least to the days of Louis Pasteur and Antoine Bechamp in 19th century France, so let’s take a closer look at what happened there to understand where we are now.

Pasteur vs. Bechamp

French scientists Louis Pasteur and Antoine Bechamp became bitter rivals as they advocated completely different theories of disease and infection. Pasteur proposed the idea of germ theory which taught that disease was caused by pathogenic microbes which invaded the body. He pioneered heating substances like raw milk to very high temperatures to kill the germs (this technique named pasteurization is still used today and named after him). This approach went hand-in-hand with Western Medicine’s drug-based approach, since it’s all about killing the germs before they kill you. On the other hand, Bechamp proposed the idea of host theory which taught that microbes are opportunistic and only attack and gain a foothold in organisms which are already weakened. Bechamp saw germs as the footnote to the disease, the end product of a longer process which started with the person already weakening their inner terrain. This could have been done through lack of nutrition, lack of exercise, lack of sleep, stress, emotional imbalance, poor lifestyle choices and exposure to toxins. Bechamp realized that people already have bacteria and viruses in their bodies all the time, yet the balance of beneficial bacteria keeps the harmful bacteria in check.

So, according to host theory, you don’t ‘catch’ germs that make you sick. Disease-causing germs arise opportunistically and begin to thrive in you only after you have already developed an internal weakness or imbalance in your body. They are a byproduct of the disease, not the cause of the disease. Bechamp theorized that germs were actually the chemical byproducts, dead tissue and degenerative aspects of a body’s unbalanced state. He stated living entities called microzymas (tiny enzymes) created bacteria in response to host and environmental factors. I often avoid using the heavily-biased Wikipedia for information (and in this area it is very pro-germ theory, pro-allopathy and pro-vaccine), however the following paragraph does a good job summarizing Bechamp’s idea:

Claiming discovery that the “molecular granulations” in biological fluids were actually the elementary units of life, Béchamp named them microzymas—that is, “tiny enzymes”—and credited them with producing enzymes and were the builders of cells while “evolving” amid favorable conditions into bacteria. Denying that bacteria could invade a healthy animal and cause disease, Béchamp claimed instead that unfavorable host and environmental conditions destabilize the host’s native microzymas, whereupon they decompose host tissue by producing pathogenic bacteria. (Source)

Germ Theory Triumphs; People Forget about the Inner Terrain

Germ theory prevailed over host theory in the minds of many at the time, especially within the medical community. Despite this, that it is reported that, on his death bed, Pasteur renounced germ theory and admitted that Bechamp had been right all along (“Le microbe n’est rien, le terrain est tout.” [“The microbe is nothing, the terrain is everything”]). In my opinion, the acceptance of germ theory and the denigration of host theory has had disastrous effects for human health. It has conditioned people to be fearful of germs, to focus on the outer terrain and to look outside of themselves to antibiotics, petrochemical drugs, vaccines, radiation, chemotherapy and other allopathic interventions to save them from disease. Yes, there is a time and place for some of these measures, but the side effects are horrible, including vaccine-induced damage and the rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, a whole new class of microbes which are on the verge of rendering antibiotics useless.

Béchamp got the bigger picture. He understood it was all about balance. He realized the importance of the inner terrain environments we create. As mentioned above, there are many factors that go into the creation of your bio-terrain, but the primary factor is the food you ingest. Food is medicine. Food can either strengthen or weaken your bio-terrain, and that means the difference between supporting health and ease – or supporting sickness and dis-ease.

 

(Source: naturalblaze.com; August 23, 2019; https://www.naturalblaze.com/?p=41500)